We Say Good-Bye to America's Little Sweetheart!

On Monday we had to say goodbye to The all time Child Star of the Silver Screen!

Shirley Temple
1928 - 2014


Shirley Temple, the dimpled, curly-haired child star who sang, danced, sobbed and grinned her way into the hearts of Depression-era moviegoers, has died, according to publicist Cheryl Kagan. She was 85.  

"When the spirit of the people is lower than at any other time during this Depression, it is a splendid thing that for just 15 cents, an American can go to a movie and look at the smiling face of a baby and forget his troubles," Roosevelt said.

A talented and ultra-adorable entertainer, Shirley Temple was America's top box-office draw from 1935 to 1938, a record no other child star has come near. She beat out such grown-ups as Clark Gable, Bing Crosby, Robert Taylor, Gary Cooper and Joan Crawford. 

Temple was credited with helping save 20th Century Fox from bankruptcy with films such as "Curly Top" and "The Littlest Rebel." She even had a drink named after her, an appropriately sweet and innocent cocktail of ginger ale and grenadine, topped with a maraschino cherry.  

She won a special Academy Award in early 1935 for her "outstanding contribution to screen entertainment" in the previous year.

Her fans seemed interested in every last golden curl on her head: It was once guessed that she had more than 50. Her mother was said to have done her hair in pin curls for each movie, with every hairstyle having exactly 56 curls.

On her eighth birthday -- she actually was turning 9, but the studio wanted her to be younger -- Temple received more than 135,000 presents from around the world, according to "The Films of Shirley Temple," a 1978 book by Robert Windeler. The gifts included a baby kangaroo from Australia and a prize Jersey calf from schoolchildren in Oregon.


In this song she sings about all the things she is going to do when she grows up.  And boy, did Shirley Temple do A LOT of things as an adult!



This is a song she is known for!



This scene is a famous scene between Shirley Temple and Bill "Bojangles" Robinson.  This was one of the first interracial scenes in the movies.  It's a great tap dancing scene!


Article information from ~ MSN